July - December 2019

Women on South African boards – facts, fiction and forward thinking

The Steinhoff Saga Management review - University of Stellenbosch Business School

July – December 2019

Women on South African boards
– facts, fiction and forward thinking

  • Report by Prof Anita Bosch, Prof Kathleen van der Linde & Shimon Barit
  • MAR 2020

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Women make up 51% of the South African population. Yet, only 20,7% of directors of JSE-listed companies are female. So, there is work to be done. This report aims to help board members, management teams and the public to understand how South Africa got to this point, and what we can do to change it.

There are five sections to the report:

  1. Facts and fiction: This section presents statistics on how many women are on boards, both in South Africa and abroad. The report then explores how statistics can be misleading when taken out of context. The part concludes by debunking five misperceptions about women on boards.
  2. True stories: lessons from the rest of the world: This section looks at other countries to determine how quotas and targets have been used to encourage gender parity on boards.
  3. The limits of the law: The South African legal framework has two parts. The first looks at the current legislation, the second highlights the gaps in the framework.
  4. Forward thinking: getting more women on boards: This section explores what it takes to get more women on boards, and more out of the women that are on boards. It looks at what it takes for women directors to be able to effect change through power, influence and critical mass.
  5. Moving forward: turning theory into action: This section explains what we can do to encourage inclusive boards. This includes interventions, critical conversations and lobbying to increase board diversity.

The lead author of this report is Prof Anita Bosch, USB Research Chair of Women at Work. The publication of this report is sponsored by WDB Investment Holdings.

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About the report

Women on South African boards: facts, fiction and forward thinking is a publication of the Research Chair: Women at Work, at the University of Stellenbosch Business School, the publication of which was sponsored by WDB Investment Holdings (WDBIH) and published in March 2020 on the USB Management Review platform.

Prof Anita Bosch, USB Research Chair: Women at Work

Prof Kathleen van der Linde, Professor of Mercantile Law, University of Johannesburg

Shimon Barit, USB Research Fellow

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Report The state of play in African coaching

State of Play in African Coaching

The Steinhoff Saga Management review - University of Stellenbosch Business School

July – December 2019

State of Play in African Coaching

Report The state of play in African coaching

  • Report by Nicky Terblanche, Jacques Myburgh and Jonathan Passmore
  • DEC 2019

6 minutes to read

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How is the coaching profession doing in Africa?

Globally, coaching is US$2 billion industry. Research on all aspects of coaching is therefore warranted. In 2016, the European Coaching and Mentoring Project was undertaken to explore coaching practices across Europe. In 2019, the same research was repeated in Africa to gain deeper insight into how coaches and coach providers practice coaching on the African continent, as well as to situate coaching in Africa within a wider context. This report provides an overview of the results, as well a comparison to the European results.

Coaching practice data was gathered via an online survey based on the original European Coaching and Mentoring Project, excluding the mentoring dimensions. In certain cases, the questions were tailored for the African context.

What did the study find?

The results indicate a significant similarity to the European study, although in a minority of instances there are telling differences. The relative similarity of coaching practice in Africa and Europe bodes well for an emerging discipline striving for professionalisation. However, it is also clear that Africa has unique needs and challenges, prompting coaching to deviate from European coaching norms where necessary.

The survey looked at, among others, the following:

  • How much time do coaches in Africa spend on conducting coaching?
  • How much do they charge?
  • How many years do the majority of coaches have?
  • What do the commissioners of coaching look for in a coach – a professional qualification or experience?
  • Which coaching models are preferred for career coaching? And for specific issues?
  • Do coaches prefer written or verbal coaching agreements?

This research was commissioned by the University of Stellenbosch Business School in association with Coaches and Mentors of South Africa (COMENSA) and the Henley Centre of Coaching.

Download full report

Related articles

Mar 02

8 minutes to read

Women on South African boards ...
Dec 09

6 minutes to read

State of Play in African Coach...

Join the USB Management Review community

Subscribe to receive an email alert for new content on USB Management Review.

SUBSCRIBE NOW