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Africa industrialisation day

The outcry for Africa to industrialise is growing louder!

USB News

The outcry for Africa to industrialise is growing louder!

Africa industrialisation day

  • Nov 11
  • Tags UN’s Sustainable Development Goal (SDG), Africa Industrialisation Day, African Union

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This Africa Industrialisation Day we reflect on the pace at which Africa is developing. Most African nations are eager to industrialise given the associated benefits of job creation, economic resilience and technological diffusion. However, it is the agglomeration and development of industrial clusters in Africa that will ultimately lead to progress.

The UN’s Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 9 aims to ‘build resilient infrastructure, promote sustainable industrialisation and foster innovation’. Within the development financing space – the African Development Bank has ranked industrial development as one of ‘top priorities’ whereas, the World Bank Group has sustained its promotion of ‘creating the conditions for a more competitive manufacturing sector’ in Africa as a response to dependence on commodities. Overall, how African countries push the pace of industrialisation depends on how well they address the ‘bottlenecks’ at policy, regional and continental levels. This is why it’s very important for policy makers and donors, alike to identify as well as establish appropriate development strategies and related mechanisms to accelerate Africa’s industrialisation agenda.

The African Union’s first 10 years of the implementation of the Agenda 2063 focuses on regional integration. It advocates for Regional Industrialisation Hubs through a framework that supports value chains, business development and services, innovation and incubation, entrepreneurship to create wealth and employment and strengthen informed advancement of the regions private sector; this is in line with the UN’s SDGs:

SDG Goal 8, indicator 8.2, aims at achieving higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors.

An additional Goal 9, indicators 9.2 and 9.3, speak to the promotion of inclusive and sustainable industrialisation (by increasing manufacturing value added as a proportion of GDP and per capita and manufacturing employment as a proportion of total employment) and increasing the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets.

African industry generates an average of US $700 of GDP per capita, barely one-fifth of East Asia’s US $3 400.

According to the Africa Development Bank, Africa’s lack of industries is largely responsible for its low standing in global development. The continent is said to be the weakest link in an interconnected global economy.

Africa’s industrialisation strategy has followed a familiar pattern starting with inward looking policies (such as import substitution) post-independence, followed by outward policies that liberalise trade. This pattern led to a boom in state-led/ state-owned manufacturing entities and a subsequent destruction of the same as a result of liberal trade policy reforms, leading to job losses and a decline in the share of the sector to GDP in many African countries (see for instance Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda). Thus, while closing borders worked for the USA and China, Africa’s gains from a similar strategy were only short-lived. Moreover Africa’s development partners like the World Trade Organisation advocate for open borders. For this reason, Africa needs to accelerate its integration agenda along with the promotion of ‘Boosting Intra-African Trade’ (BIAT) priorities.

Africa needs to accelerate its integration agenda along with the promotion of ‘Boosting Intra-African Trade’ (BIAT) priorities.

So how should Africa industrialize in the new world order? African governments will need new approaches to industrial policy with regional and/ or continental dimensions in consideration of the operationalisation of an African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA).

A recent study by UNU WIDER’s Manufacturing Transformation of developing and developed economies, shows that agglomerations and industrial clusters or industrial parks provide a window of opportunity towards closing Africa’s industrialisation gap.

Evidence from Cambodia, Vietnam and Tunisia suggest that African governments can foster export-oriented industrial agglomerations by concentrating investment in high-quality institutions, social services, and infrastructure in a limited physical area such as an export processing zone (EPZ).

Such an industrial agglomeration, UNU WIDER argues, would be designed to serve the global market. Thus, within the framework of trade liberalisation, countries should use trade policy to promote the international competitiveness of domestic enterprises; improve export competitiveness of such enterprises; diversify markets and increase exports; and accelerate economic integration.

As instruments to industrial development, industrial parks require long-term investments. This partly implies that the African governments must collectively strengthen and harmonise their public policies to attract long-term investors, including private sector

Current experimenters like Ethiopia and Senegal who have raised funds for their industrial parks, show that sustainable industrialisation is achievable through a strong link between infrastructure development and inclusive and sustainable industry innovation.

Evidence from Ghana points to the role of the private sector not only for sustainable financing but for industrial production that is driven by the application of science and technology. Researchers argue that the industrial policy should therefore aim at promoting agro-processing, facilitating the development of commercially viable export and domestic market-oriented enterprises in the rural areas, improving agricultural marketing and enhancing access to export markets, and improving the competitiveness of domestic industrial products. At regional level, the Costed Action Plan for SADC Industrialisation Strategy and Roadmap provides an example of possible regional value-chain clusters among countries, a model that could be replicated in other regions on the continent.

Africa can leverage its current endowment to make the industrial clusters or parks model a success. Industrial clusters usually attract ‘specialised trading firms’ – this could benefit small and medium domestic firms thus enabling the very firms’ access to regional and continental markets following the operationalisation of AfCFTA.

Africa’s rapidly growing population provides a demographic dividend for labour – the industrial cluster model allows the matching of ‘youthful’ workers to jobs, while learning on-the-job facilitates the diffusion of knowledge. Further, a consumer boom due to a growing middle class, provides a ready market in Africa – the operationalisation of the AfCFTA presents a market of 1.2 billion people.

Given the significant benefits from agglomeration, it is important that firms cluster across borders to stimulate the much-needed economic transformation.

The actualisation of this, according to UNIDO, requires that the continent strengthens its institutions, knowledge of global value chains, value-add to agriculture and mineral beneficiation through manufacture in order to participate in the global value chain, invest in skills development to leapfrog technology and, finally, leverage development finance.


Dr Lwanga Elizabeth Nanziri is a Senior Lecturer in Development Finance at the University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB). Her research interests include Development Economics, Financial Inclusion for Households and Firms, Behavioural Economics, Gender and Welfare, and Public Policy Analysis. She is the director of the Association for the Advancement of African Women Economists in South Africa, and has served as the Chief Executive Officer of the South African Savings Institute, founded by the Ministry of Finance and the Industrial Development Corporation.

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Project Management student gets promoted to senior position at mining company

Project Management student gets promoted to senior position at mining company

USB News

Project Management student gets promoted to senior position at mining company

Project Management student gets promoted to senior position at mining company

  • Oct 10
  • Tags Project Management, Alumni, Promotion, Mining, Construction, USB students

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USB student Wayne Smit, who is enrolled for the Postgraduate Diploma in Project Management as ARPL (Assessment and Recognition of Prior Learning) candidate, was recently promoted to Construction Superintendent for the Palabora Lift ll Project of the Palabora Mining Company. The project is worth over R9 billion.

“The Lift II Project involves the collaboration of 48 sub-projects, both on surface and underground. This includes the construction of a surface processing plant, underground batch plant and the development of a twin decline and Lift II production area – all at an estimated cost of over R9 billion,” he says.

Here he shares his journey at USB:

I live in Phalaborwa and started working for Palabora Mining Company in 2003 when I was 18 years old. Originally I qualified as a Millwright (Mechanical & Electrical Trade) and ended up years’ later working in mining and construction projects as an inspector. I was promoted to Engineering Construction Specialist in 2017 and then recently to Construction Superintendent – as a result from the qualification I am obtaining from USB (Postgraduate Diploma in Project Management). My main line of work is planning and managing construction & mechanical projects, especially underground as well as forming part of BRR projects all over the mine.

 When I started in projects as an inspector I felt that I needed to equip myself better for this role. I enrolled for Project Management short courses and it was during this time that I met Prof Herman Steyn who told me about the PGDip in Project Management at USB. He told me that it would be possible for me to be accepted in this course based on ARPL. So this is what I did.

“This is probably one of the most informative and comprehensive Project Management courses I have done.”

I decided to study at USB because it is the only university that offers this programme at NQF 8 level and it has multiple accreditations. However, the main reason for me is that the school was highly recommended by Prof Herman Steyn – the father of project management.

 This is probably one of the most informative and comprehensive Project Management courses I have done. I have learned so much! However, if I have to single one thing out it would be how I learned to create a dashboard and portfolio to manage the multiple projects I am responsible for. This is maybe the one thing that helps me keep on track with my projects and helps me manage their budgets and quality.

 “One of the highlights for me was being able to experience the amount of project experience that came with the lecturers and to gain from their wisdom.”

I stay in the most Northern part of our country but was fortunate enough to travel to Cape Town once every three months over a period of two years. One of the highlights for me was being able to experience the amount of project experience that came with the lecturers and to gain from their wisdom.

 I challenge for me was to balance my work and studies. My job requires a lot of time on site and in meetings and that meant that I had little time at night to study and complete my assignments. Also, every third month I had to leave site for at least 10 days to travel and attend class. This was challenging because I had to appoint a competent person in my place to manage while I was gone. However, the reward of completing this degree is all worth it.

 My new role’s responsibilities will include the following three categories:

  • Creating Value
  • Aligning People
  • Getting Results

“This is probably one of the most informative and comprehensive Project Management courses that I have done. One of the highlights for me was being able to gain from my lecturers’ wisdom.”

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Learnings from shadowing a CEO for a day news

Learnings from shadowing a CEO for a day

USB News

Learnings from shadowing a CEO for a day

Learnings from shadowing a CEO for a day news

  • Oct 04
  • Tags CEOX1Day, MBA, Experience, CEO, Leadership

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USB MBA student Jessie Hurst was selected as a participant for Odgers Berndtson’s CEOx1Day programme where she spent the day with Afrimat’s CEO Andries van Heerden. This global scheme is designed to uncover promising future leaders and give them an opportunity to walk in the shoes of a senior business leader.

“The most striking thing about Afrimat is their culture. One of their key values states that they strive to do everything in an atmosphere of joy and positivity, and this was truly evident in every interaction I had with Andries and his amazing team,” says Hurst of her experience.

Here she shares her experience:

The Opportunity

It is not often that one has the privilege to participate in an initiative where you get to shadow one of South Africa’s most successful CEOs. The Odgers Berndtson CEOx1DAY programme made it possible for me to spend a day with Afrimat CEO Andries van Heerden and what an incredible experience that was!

The Afrimat Experience

The most striking thing about Afrimat is their culture. One of their key values states that they strive to do everything in an atmosphere of joy and positivity, and this was truly evident in every interaction I had with Andries and his amazing team.

There was a sense of eagerness and willingness from individuals to share information and include me in real and relevant conversations regarding challenges and strategic decisions. The distinct focus and intention on delivery at Afrimat was extraordinary and evident in how well prepared the leaders were and how engaged the discussions were that I had the privilege to attend.

Andries runs his organisation with focused intention – and it is clear that this is emulated by his senior leadership team and that it filters down to functional teams. I got the distinct sense that everyone was working towards a shared objective and were committed to the shared success of Afrimat.

The most valuable learning from the day was the extent to which Andries shared his knowledge and embraced the teaching moment. He demonstrated true selfless leadership, and it was inspiring to watch and learn how to be a successful leader in a challenging South African environment, dealing with complex challenges.

I’m grateful to have been able to witness an incredible organisation truly living their ‘why’.  Afrimat is built on good values and run by highly competent individuals and teams under Andries’ experienced and skilled leadership.

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Innovation not a prerequisite for entrepreneurship web

Innovation ‘not a prerequisite for entrepreneurship’

USB News

Innovation ‘not a prerequisite for entrepreneurship’

Innovation not a prerequisite for entrepreneurship web

  • Oct 04
  • Tags Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Tips, Strengths

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“Young people should be taught that you should constantly strive to improve your business through innovation, but innovation is certainly not a prerequisite for entrepreneurship,” says Daniel Strauss, USB lecturer and MBA alumnus.

“In emerging markets, there are so many opportunities for entrepreneurs to compete on simple terms like customer service or convenience, whereby you can start to compete in a market and actually dominate that market just by providing a better service than the current market participants.”

Strauss is a Private Equity and Venture Capital entrepreneur and currently serves as a founding member and Director of Stocks & Strauss (Pty) Ltd. He is also an extraordinary lecturer on the MBA programme.

Here he shares five tips for aspiring entrepreneurs:

  1. Know the rules: Before you attempt the world of entrepreneurship, make sure that you know the rules of the game. I explain the rules of the game very clearly at the beginning of my lectures.
  2. Identify and focus on your core strength: You can always outsource tasks that fall outside of your core competence to others who complement your weaknesses with their strengths.
  3. Focus on building a strong foundation first: Only once the foundation is rock solid will the creative side be able to complement the foundation and thereby lead to the emergence of true value.
  4. Pay your tax: Paying tax is a sign that you are making money. Some entrepreneurs focus on tax avoidance to such an extent that they start to practice “revenue avoidance” without even noticing the negative thinking pattern that crept up on them over time.
  5. Create and measure shareholder value: Make sure that you understand how shareholder value is created and measured. A well designed exit strategy can create as much economic value as all the hard work of actually building the business
Strauss is pictured here with his wife and former Miss World 2014, Rolene Strauss, who is currently enrolled for her MPhil in Management Coaching, and USB MBA head Martin Butler.

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office psychopath research

The dangers of the office psychopath

USB News

The dangers of the office psychopath

office psychopath research

  • Aug 01
  • Tags Corporate psychopathy, work stress,  leadership, bullying

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Psychopaths are not just found in serial killer movies and crime novels – they stalk corporate corridors too, where their trail of destruction might not include murder but can mean the death of productivity, motivation and profits.

The manipulation, deception, inflated self-opinion and back-stabbing of the corporate psychopath or narcissist can often cause work-related depression, anxiety disorders, burnout and physical illnesses: conditions which cost the South African economy more than R40-billion1 annually.

Corporate Mental Health Week (1 to 5 July 2019) turned the spotlight on work-related stress that accounts for more than 40% of all workplace-related illnesses in South Africa, with at least 1 in 4 employees diagnosed with depression2.

Prof Renata Schoeman, Psychiatrist and Associate Professor in Leadership at the University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB), says it is often the leaders – who should be at the forefront of reducing workplace conditions that lead to stress and burnout – who contribute to the problem, rather than the solution.

“We are not talking about the ‘difficult’ boss here, but the boss who is a bully – many of who could be defined as corporate psychopaths.”

“The bullying tactics of corporate psychopaths increase conflict, stress, staff turnover and absenteeism; reduce productivity and collective social responsibility; and erode corporate culture and ethical standards – diminishing shareholder value and returns on investment,” Prof Schoeman said.

Workplace bullying is a major cause of work-related stress, Dr Schoeman said, pointing to a 2017 survey in the USA which found that adults were being bullied at levels similar to teenagers – 31% of adults had been bullied at work and almost half believed that bullying behaviour was becoming more acceptable in the workplace3.

“Bullying can make you ill,” she said. “In the same survey, 70% or more of bullying victims had experienced stress, anxiety or depression, 55% reported loss of confidence, 39% suffered from lack of sleep, 17% called in sick frequently, and 19% had suffered mental breakdown. Emotional stress can also cause or aggravate physical illnesses such as gastrointestinal problems (such as irritable bowel syndrome) and cardiovascular problems (such as hypertension), while victims of workplace bullying had double the risk of considering suicide in the five years following.”

“The workplace bullies to be most concerned about are those with narcissistic personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder.”

Chief executives have the highest prevalence of psychopathic traits of all jobs – a rate second only to prison inmates – and while it is estimated that 1 in 100 of the general population have psychopathic traits, this rises to 1 in 25 in business leaders4.

In what she calls “the curse of confidence”, Prof Schoeman said that many of the traits characteristic of psychopaths – such as charm, fearless dominance, boldness and a “grandiose sense of self” – are also what help people get ahead in business.

She emphasised however, that “not everyone with loads of confidence and who is successful, even if they have a brash approach to people, has a personality disorder”.

The workplace bullies to be most concerned about, she said, are those with narcissistic personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder.

Prof Schoeman says narcissists can be brilliant strategists, have the courage to take risks and push through massive change and transition, and use their charisma and compelling visions to inspire others – fitting into conventional ideas of leadership.

“Narcissists tend to be over-sensitive to criticism, over-competitive, and often engage in counter-productive work behaviour when their self-esteem is threatened. They expect great dedication and may overwork others without any regard for the impact on their lives,” she said.

“It is important to be equipped to recognise and safeguard oneself against these workplace bullies.”

She said narcissists favoured “indirect bullying tactics” such as withholding information, ignoring people or giving them the “silent treatment”, spreading rumours to discredit others, and inflating their contribution or taking credit for achievements they had little to do with.

The “darker personality”, she said, is the psychopathic character, the boss or colleague with antisocial personality disorder – who replaces the narcissist’s exploitative tactics with predatory drive for strategic conquests, domination and cruelty.

She said that “successful psychopaths” share the same core characteristics as those who become criminals – deceit, manipulativeness, indifference to the consequences of their actions, superficial charm, lack of empathy and lack of remorse – but tend to come from more privileged backgrounds and have higher IQ.

“Successful psychopaths tend to be more conscientious than those with a criminal record. They are less impulsive, negligent and irresponsible, but this doesn’t mean they are always law-abiding citizens – they may just be better at avoiding being caught,” she said

Prof Schoeman said the bullying tactics of the “successful psychopath” were based on assessing the usefulness and weaknesses of those around them, manipulating others to bond with them, using their victims’ feedback to build and maintain control, and then abandoning them when they were no longer useful.

“They are extremely efficient at using and manipulating communication networks to enhance their own reputation while discrediting others and creating and maintaining conflicts and rivalries amongst colleagues. They are excellent at spreading disinformation, while covering up their own association with this false information,” she said.

Prof Schoeman said both narcissists and psychopaths had traits that could be positive and they could be highly successful in business – “but they can also create highly toxic environments with just as significant an emotional and financial toll on employees and organisations as other more obvious workplace stress factors”.

“It is important to be equipped to recognise and safeguard oneself against these workplace bullies,” she said.

So how to deal with the office narcissist or psychopath? Prof Schoeman shares the following tactics:

Tips for dealing with antisocial bosses or colleagues:
• Keep your emotions in check

• Don’t show you are intimidated

• Stick to the facts – do not get drawn into their victimhood stories

• Ground yourself

• Accept that some people are bad news

• Know your weaknesses – which the psychopath will exploit

• Take care of yourself, manage your stress, and build your resilience

• Build your reputation and relationships

• Protect yourself

• Report incidents of bullying and harassment to human resources

• Opt for online communication (where negotiation and manipulation are more difficult)

• Disarm the psychopath

• Turn the conversation back to them when they are blaming someone else

• Point out their flaws (e.g. their reaction in a meeting and asking them if they are feeling stressed)

• Safeguard the organisation

• Have an ombudsman or anonymous tip line at work – regular workers often pick up on the psychopath’s game before management does

• Cross-check your impressions of your high-potentials with colleagues who know them well

• Expect responsibility

• Guarantee consequences

• Provide predictable punishment – without delay

• Know the law

The strategies for dealing with a narcissist boss or colleague:

  • Avoid contact
  • Ignore their actions
  • Stay neutral, calm and professional
  • Resist the urge to challenge or confront them
  • Don’t offer or give any personal information or opinions
  • Ground yourself
  • Realise it is not personal
  • Realise their insecurity
  • Accept that change likely won’t happen
  • Build a supportive network
  • Reach out for help
  • Know your legal rights
  • Protect yourself
  • Set clear boundaries (be assertive but not aggressive)
  • Have a witness
  • Get everything in writing
  • Be alert: when a narcissist can no longer control you, they will try instead to control how others see you
  • Disarm the narcissist (this is perhaps the most difficult strategy as you might feel dishonest)
  • Always empathise with your boss’s feelings but don’t expect any empathy back
  • Give your boss ideas, but always let them take the credit for it

RESEARCH REFERENCES

Workplace stress costs the SA economy R40bn a year: IDEA study of the London School of Economics and Political Science 2016

40% of all work related illnesses are due to work related stress, depression, anxiety, burnout; and 1 in 4 employees are depressed 

Workplace adult bullying USA stats

Corporate psychopathy: Talking the walk. Babiak PNeumann CSHare RD 2010

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USB-Kgalema Leadership Lecture Series 2019

USB to host annual USB-Kgalema Motlanthe Leadership Lecture Series in October

USB News

USB to host annual USB-Kgalema Motlanthe Leadership Lecture Series in October

USB-Kgalema Leadership Lecture Series 2019
Mr Kgalema Motlanthe, former President of South Africa, and Prof Piet Naudé, Director of USB, pictured here at the inaugural event.

  • July 30
  • Tags USB-Kgalema Motlanthe Leadership Lecture Series, event

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This year the University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB) and the Kgalema Motlanthe Foundation will once again host the prestigious annual event called the USB-Kgalema Motlanthe Leadership Lecture Series. The by invitation only event will take place on Thursday, 31 October 2019.

This partnership event between USB and the Foundation is underpinned by the need to make responsible leadership part of the public debate in South Africa. For both USB and the Foundation, responsible leadership is a key value to uphold in all contexts.

“The mission of USB is to develop responsible leaders through well-grounded business education and research.  As an academic theme, it permeates the curriculum design and acts as pivotal point around which students are developed,” says Mr Owen Mbundu, head of USB’s Marketing Department.

“On an institutional level, USB has chosen to include this in its mission and values so that responsible leadership over time determines its culture.  The Kgalema Motlanthe Foundation shares in these values and philosophy. Our vision is to build on the success of this annual event which we hold close to our hearts and values,” he says.

The inaugural leadership lecture took place in Cape Town in October 2017 where Mr Kgalema Motlanthe, former President of South Africa, was the keynote speaker. This year, Mr Sim Tshabalala, Chief Executive of Standard Bank, will deliver the keynote address. Mr Tshabalala is a banker with over 22 years’ experience in the financial services industry and joined the Standard Corporate and Merchant Bank (SCMB) in 2000.

At the event the USB Alumnus of the Year will also be announced. This prestigious award goes to an alumnus who has excelled as a responsible leader, whether in the private or public sector or in an entrepreneurial venture.

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The power of resilience

USB News

The power of resilience

Entrepreneur Luvuyo Rani shares his journey at annual AABS Conference

  • June 23
  • Tags AABS Conference, Entrepreneur

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The annual Association of African Business Schools (AABS) Conference was hosted by the University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB) last week (7 – 8 June 2019). The AABS network, created in 2005, is a network of business schools striving to improve the quality of business education around the continent.

The first day of the Conference took place at the main campus of Stellenbosch University in Stellenbosch. The Conference moved to the USB campus in the Tyger Valley district, north of Cape Town, on the second day. The theme for this year’s international conference was, A Leadership Agenda for the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

“Africa has so much opportunity despite its challenges. I’m a dreamer and see the possibilities of this continent …”

Entrepreneur Luvuyo Rani, founder and managing director of IT services company Silulo Ulutho Technologies, delivered the keynote address on the first day of the conference. The former teacher started Silulo Ulutho Technologies as a micro business from the boot of his car in 2004, selling computers to teachers as his primary target.

“When I began this business I had no capital. My brother had to make a personal loan of R10 000 as seed capital for the business. Within two months, all that money was gone.

“When I went to schools, people said that I was crazy for leaving teaching to sell second hand computers. Others suspected that I was stealing computers from schools and selling them back to the schools,” he says.

But he saw an opportunity to raise funds and encouraged teachers to form a stokvel. “In a group of six, each would pay R400 a month and within six months each one of them would have a computer.

“In some schools, I would tell the teachers to give me 70% of R2400 in order for me to buy the computer and they pay the remainder the following month. In dealing with the negativity, I developed a thicker skin and kept on going to the schools and built a relationship with some teachers. Some of these relationships are ones I have still maintained to this very day,” he says.

Steadily he started setting up internet cafes in Khayelitsha, the Cape Town Township where he is from, and also realised the need to offer training to people, especially teachers and students, about how to use computers and other IT functions.

Today, Silulo Ulutho Technologies has 42 branches in South Africa, and has also started to expand beyond the borders of the country. “Africa has so much opportunity despite its challenges. I’m a dreamer and see the possibilities of this continent,” he says.

Rani is also a member of USB’s Small Business Academy (SBA) steering committee, which offers a nine-month development programme to small business owners.

“… Always remain as passionate as you can about what you do because you will face some extremely challenging times where passion will keep you sustained and breathe a fire to your spirit.”

His advice to aspiring entrepreneurs is to really focus on what they are doing. “Only once you have achieved success in this can you then go on to venture on new projects. Always remain as passionate as you can about what you do because you will face some extremely challenging times where passion will keep you sustained and breathe a fire to your spirit.

“You should always have an attitude that is positive and believe that anything is possible as long as you put your mind to it. And lastly, work hard, dream big, start small but always have a bigger picture in mind,” he advises.

Dr Marietjie Theron-Wepener, Chair of this year’s Conference, says it was the first time in the history of AABS that USB acted as host. “While the Conference is mainly a networking conference, an effort was made this year to give it more of an ‘academic flavour’,” she says.

Themes that were discussed by panels included one on the Future of Work, while Deans and Directors of African business schools shared their thoughts on the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The conference was attended by almost 120 delegates from Africa, including seven non-African countries like the United Kingdom, Italy and the USA.

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Why should businesses advance human rights?

Why should businesses advance human rights?

USB News

Why should businesses advance human rights?

Why should businesses advance human rights?

  • APR 08 2019
  • Tags Leader’s Angle, Human Rights, Business, Panel Discussion

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This was the questioned addressed by a panel that included former Public Protector Prof Thuli Madonsela, political activist Jay Naidoo, and critical thinker Christopher Rutledge at a USB Leader’s Angle Series during March that explored ways on how the private sector can contribute towards human rights.

“A next step may be to unambiguously acknowledge that business is part and parcel of our political economy, directly shaping human rights outcomes through its own actions and inactions.”

– Prof Brian Ganson, head of the Africa Centre for Dispute Settlement

 

“Some of us are sitting on the mountain because of apartheid; some of us are in the valley.”

– Prof Thuli Madonsela, Law Faculty Trust Chair for Social Justice at Stellenbosch University

 

“How do we bring humanity into the place we work? We are not just numbers.”

– Lerato Molebatsi, National Executive of General Electric

 

“We still have politicians promising jobs when we know it’s a lie. Rather help people feed themselves and gain an income instead.”

– Jay Naidoo, founding General Secretary of Cosatu & former Minister in Mandela Government

WATCH: Click here for the video of the event

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SAA CEO

‘As leaders we are trustees of the future generations’, says SAA CEO Vuyani Jarana at USB Top Achiever’s Awards

USB News

‘As leaders we are trustees of the future generations’, says SAA CEO Vuyani Jarana at USB Top Achiever’s Awards

SAA CEO

  • APR 20 2019
  • Tags Graduation, Top Achievers, Graduates, Alumni, Success, Responsible leaders

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“As leaders we are trustees of the future generations. We have been given stewardship of the organisations, whether it is government, business or civil society, to see the effective functioning of these institutions and systems for future generations to benefit,” says Vuyani Jarana, CEO of South African Airways (SAA).

He was the keynote speaker at a special award ceremony hosted by the University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB), where the top performing students were awarded for their successes during their academic career. Jarana is an MBA alumnus and Alumnus of the Year 2017 of USB.

He added that with such trusteeship comes a responsibility of the highest level of accountability and ethics, “so that future generations find these institutions in a better shape than when we found it ourselves in order to build a better continent at large”.

To view photos of the event, click here

“Business schools therefore play a crucial role in preparing leaders with insights and knowledge to navigate the complex issues and to be better trustees at the work in hand.”

“Africa requires significant investment in a number of areas in order to improve the human development index, infrastructure, and education if Africa is to improve itself from the current economic challenges. Business schools therefore play a crucial role in preparing leaders with insights and knowledge to navigate the complex issues and to be better trustees at the work in hand. Educational institutions need to find models that address the opportunities that are deeply embedded in a very complex structure of African economies,” he adds.

Jarana says there has been a lot of progress made by African governments to align the African continent. “However, more policy instruments such as the Single African Air Transport Market (SAATM) that the Africa Union (AU) is putting together, must be driven pragmatically by businesses taking advantage of the opportunities coming out of these policy decisions.

“We expect the academic community to provide a leading role in understanding how we could move from policy to execution.”

He also says that the Fourth Industrial Revolution presents opportunities for Africa to focus on development, in terms of comparison with the path already taken by the developed world. “Key areas of opportunities lie in improving education through access  to resources, bridging the gap between the rich and poor, urban and rural, and access to capital and ensuring greater financial inclusion across segments of society.”

 

“Unless the continent embraces the Fourth Industrial Revolution, it will be left behind. Its development will continue to lag behind the developed world and remain a spectator in global trade with a direct effect on youth employment, human development as well as overall economic activities,” he says.

 

***

The USB Top Achievers Awards celebrates the top performing postgraduate students of the University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB). The USB Director’s Award, for a student in any programme who excels in both studies and leadership, was awarded to Poonam Harry-Nana, a Full-time MBA graduate.

USB Director Prof Piet Naudé says not only did she graduate cum laude, but she arranged all the social activities and ensured that the class had a good balance between academic work and outside activities. “Poonam has a passion for communities and she will continue to leave her mark through various levels of social engagement,” he says.

Here’s the full list of recipients:

 

Top Student: Postgraduate Diploma in Futures Studies – Jan Roesch

Sponsor: PSG: Zelda Rauch

 

Top Student: Postgraduate Diploma in Financial Planning – Dilshaad Samsodien

Sponsor: Hisense: Hale Liu

 

Top Student in the FPI Professional Competency Examination 2018 – Jaya Leibowitz

 

Top Student: Postgraduate Diploma in Development Finance – Shivangi Bhagwan

Sponsor: Guaranty Trust Bank, Nigeria: facilitated by Mr Isa Omagu

 

Top Student: Postgraduate Diploma in Leadership Development – Kashifa Bardien and Annelie Tredoux

Sponsor: PPS: Danielle Muller and PSG: Zelda Rauch

 

Top Student: Postgraduate Diploma in Project Management – Jessica Vervalle

Sponsor: PSG: Zelda Rauch

 

Top Student: Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management and Administration – Michelle Beukes

Sponsor: PSG: Zelda Rauch

 

Top Student: MPhil in Futures Studies – Deidre Samson

Sponsor: PSG: Anton Rauch

 

Top Student: MPhil in Management Coaching – Barbara Fölscher-Kingwill

Sponsor: PSG: Anton Rauch

 

Top Student: MPhil in Development Finance – Simba Mudimbu

Sponsor: Guaranty Trust Bank, Nigeria

 

Top Students: MBA

Andries Strydom (2018 Full-Time)

Eben Odendaal     (2017 Blended)

Julie Choe               (2017 Modular E1)

Gerrit De Villiers  (2017 Modular Afrikaans)

Dr Jaco Franken  (2017 Modular E2)

Sponsor: PPS, Danielle Muller

 

TOP MBA overall – Dr Jaco Franken

Sponsor: PPS, Danielle Muller

 

Best Research Assignment in any Master’s Degree: Qualitative – Kamilah Collison

Sponsor: Brimstone Investment Corporation

Topic of MBA Research Assignment: Greenwashing and the role of Consumer Environmental Concern on Green Purchase Intention

 

Best Research Assignment in any Master’s Degree: Quantitative – Sindiso Valerie Ndlovu

Sponsor: Brimstone Investment Corporation

Topic of MPhil Development Finance Research Assignment: Relationship between the oil price and exchange rate volatility in Nigeria – application of VAR-DCC-GARCH mode

 

PhD Business Management and Administration – Dr Colin Habberton

Sponsor: The Morne Mostert Award for a Futures Studies or Futures-related PhD in Business Management and Administration

Topic of PhD thesis: Connecting capital: The factors influencing the decision-making process of institutional investors towards responsible investing

 

PhD Graduates of 2018/19

December 2018

Dr Afolabi  Adejumo
Dr Richard Akota
Dr Timothy Aluko
Dr Master Mushonga
Dr Ralph Nordjo
Dr Joseph Nyeadi
Dr Emmanuel Oduro-Afriyie

 

April 2019

Dr Nthabiseng Moleko
Dr Candice Booysen
Dr Colin Habberton

To view more photos of the event, click here

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economic development

Workshop on new business opportunities in Eswatini to promote economic development

USB News

Workshop on new business opportunities in Eswatini to promote economic development

  • APR 03 2019
  • Tags Workshop, Enterprise Development, Africa Centre for Development Finance

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The African Centre for Development Finance (ACDF) of the USB facilitated a one-week workshop for business counsellors and trainers on the Fundamentals of Small Enterprise Development Company (SEDCO) in Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland). The workshop was sponsored by the Capacity Strengthening & Technical Corporation Project (CSTCP), a European Union funded project developed as a support project.

The ACDF is a strategic initiative of USB set up to address the development challenges of the continent at large, especially in the field of development finance and financial inclusiveness.

Delegates to the workshop included senior managers, supervisors, business trainers and business counsellors from SEDCO. The workshop was facilitated by Dr Sola Oduwole, the Centre’s coordinator.

The main objective of the workshop was to provide participants with the tools and techniques on preparing a business plan from an adaptable template, conducting feasibility studies, and assessing the feasibility and overall health of a business for small enterprises. They were imparted with the knowledge of using the new business opportunities in an inspiring, stimulating and accelerate way to promote economic development, youth employment and emancipation of rural economy.

The second step was to identify and study trends related with challenges of growth opportunities ecosystems, improve competitiveness, and apply this knowledge to create innovative solutions. This was illustrated with a real time visit to an emerging entrepreneur in the niche market of producing iron door and window frames. At the site visit to ACERO Steel Frames (PTY), one of the incubated enterprises of SEDCO in Eswatini, a situational analysis on the performance of this enterprise was conducted. The Managing Director Ernest Mdluli benefited immensely from the wealth of freshly imparted knowledge of the participant of SEDCO.

The Chief Executive Officer of SEDCO, Dorrington Matiwane, as well as the Principal Secretary in the Ministry of Ministry of Economic Planning and Development, Siboniso Nkambule, were present at the closing ceremony as well the presentation of letters of participation to the participants.

Overall, the participants achieved greater intellectual development and a deeper knowledge of enterprise problem-solving capacities, critical thinking, and abilities to understand complexity and ambiguity of small-Scale enterprise development process.

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