July - December 2019

The gender pay gap: a guide for the already converted

The Steinhoff Saga Management review - University of Stellenbosch Business School

July – December 2019

The gender pay gap: a guide for the already converted

  • Report by Prof Anita Bosch
  • MAY 2020

SHARE

Around the world, women are paid less than men are paid. This guide explores why this matters, and what we can do to change it.

As a guide for the already converted, this document does not spend time on facts and statistics on how big the wage gap is. Instead, it provides arguments and actions to help close the gap.

It covers the following:

  • Closing the gap on injustice, explaining how this impacts society
  • De­fining and calculating the gender pay gap, including steps that companies can use when conducting gender pay gap audits
  • South African governance and legislation, quoting conventions and frameworks that help to protect women
  • Factors that drive the gender pay gap, referring to women’s career paths, ideas about the roles women should play in society, and perceptions about how they should behave
  • Time for change, explaining ways to help create a more equal society.

Yes, the gender pay gap is complex and multi-faceted. But the bottom line is this: The gender wage gap will not close itself. It will take effort from all South Africans – including directors and managers – to ensure that women are paid fairly.

This report has been written by Prof Anita Bosch, USB Research Chair: Women at Work at the University of Stellenbosch Business School. The publication of this report has been sponsored by WDB Investment Holdings, a company that strategically invests in the corporate sector and the development of women.

Read more: Prof Anita Bosch and Shimon Barit, both from USB, have written a journal article titled Gender pay transparency mechanisms: Future directions for South Africa about this topic as well. The article was published in the South African Journal of Science. Read it here.

Download full report

Related articles

May 26

6 minutes to read

The gender pay gap: a guide fo...
Mar 02

8 minutes to read

Women on South African boards ...

Join the USB Management Review community

Subscribe to receive an email alert for new content on USB Management Review.

SUBSCRIBE NOW


GEMS report 2020

South Africa’s Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Report

The Steinhoff Saga Management review - University of Stellenbosch Business School

July – December 2019

South Africa’s Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Report

GEMS report 2020

  • Report by Angus Bowmaker-Falconer and Mike Herrington
  • JUNE 2020

SHARE

Download full report
Download the summary

How does entrepreneurship in SA compare to entrepreneurship worldwide? 

The UK-based Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) has been carrying out research on entrepreneurship ecosystems around the world since 1999. GEM is a consortium of teams primarily associated with top academic institutions in various countries. This year, South Africa contributes to this research through the GEM report prepared by the University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB) and the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) as funder. South Africa’s entrepreneurial ecosystem was rated one of the most challenging in the sample of participating economies in 2019 and has exhibited little sign of improvement over the past few years. In 2019, South Africa ranked 49th out of 54 economies on GEM’s National Entrepreneurship Context Index, ahead of only Croatia, Guatemala, Paraguay, Puerto Rico and Iran. This index provides a single composite number that can express the average state and quality of the entrepreneurial ecosystem in a country, and be compared to those of other economies.

What did SA’s GEM report find?

Titled Igniting startups for economic growth and social change, South Africa’s GEM report provides answers to this question: How do we ensure that more entrepreneurs flourish in South Africa? Solutions range from strengthening , to aligning learning, mentorship and support for entrepreneurs. It also includes providing entrepreneurial education for the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) and the digital economy.

Why is insight on entrepreneurship so important?

Entrepreneurship is an engine of economic growth. It promotes the innovation needed to exploit new opportunities, promote productivity and create employment, while also addressing societal challenges, which now include the economic shock wave created by the COVID-19 pandemic. The promotion of entrepreneurship will be central to restoring the economy due to this pandemic.

Find South Africa’s GEM Report here. The report was written by UBS’s Angus Bowmaker-Falconer, a research fellow at USB, and Dr Mike Herrington, who established the GEM SA in 2001.

Here are some key findings from the GEM report:

  • Societal values regarding entrepreneurship show an upward trend from 2003 to 2019. Specifically, there has been an increase from 2017 to 2019 in the number of individuals who see entrepreneurship as a good career choice (from 69.4% to 78.8%) and one with high status (from 74.9% to 82.2%).
  • There has been a substantial increase (from 43.2% in 2017 to 60.4% in 2019) in the number of individuals who perceive that there are good entrepreneurial opportunities in South Africa and, importantly, believe that they possess the necessary skills and capabilities to start a business venture. This number is relatively high compared to other economies, especially those of countries in Latin America and Europe.
  • According to the 2019 findings, only 11.9% of respondents have entrepreneurial intentions. This means one in every eight South Africans may be considered latent entrepreneurs intending to start a business within the next three years. This is in stark contrast to the average of 40% in the rest of Africa.
  • There was a small increase in the total amount of early-stage entrepreneurial activity (TEA) in the country between 2016 and 2017. This momentum was not, however, carried through to 2019, which showed no real increase from 2017 at only 10.8%. This TEA rate was below the average of 12.1% for the African region in 2019.
  • South Africa’s business exit rate decreased from 6.0% in 2017 to 4.9% in 2019, but is still higher than the established business rate of 3.5%. This confirms that more businesses are being closed down, sold or otherwise discontinued than being started.
  • There is clear evidence of purpose-driven entrepreneurship taking hold at grassroots level – an encouraging sign of a collective will for future business sustainability.

About the report

The report was written by USB’s Angus Bowmaker-Falconer, a research fellow at USB, and Mike Herrington, who established the GEM SA in 2001.

Related articles

May 26

6 minutes to read

The gender pay gap: a guide fo...
Mar 02

8 minutes to read

Women on South African boards ...

Join the USB Management Review community

Subscribe to receive an email alert for new content on USB Management Review.

SUBSCRIBE NOW


Women on South African boards – facts, fiction and forward thinking

The Steinhoff Saga Management review - University of Stellenbosch Business School

July – December 2019

Women on South African boards
– facts, fiction and forward thinking

  • Report by Prof Anita Bosch, Prof Kathleen van der Linde & Shimon Barit
  • MAR 2020

SHARE

Women make up 51% of the South African population. Yet, only 20,7% of directors of JSE-listed companies are female. So, there is work to be done. This report aims to help board members, management teams and the public to understand how South Africa got to this point, and what we can do to change it.

There are five sections to the report:

  1. Facts and fiction: This section presents statistics on how many women are on boards, both in South Africa and abroad. The report then explores how statistics can be misleading when taken out of context. The part concludes by debunking five misperceptions about women on boards.
  2. True stories: lessons from the rest of the world: This section looks at other countries to determine how quotas and targets have been used to encourage gender parity on boards.
  3. The limits of the law: The South African legal framework has two parts. The first looks at the current legislation, the second highlights the gaps in the framework.
  4. Forward thinking: getting more women on boards: This section explores what it takes to get more women on boards, and more out of the women that are on boards. It looks at what it takes for women directors to be able to effect change through power, influence and critical mass.
  5. Moving forward: turning theory into action: This section explains what we can do to encourage inclusive boards. This includes interventions, critical conversations and lobbying to increase board diversity.

The lead author of this report is Prof Anita Bosch, USB Research Chair of Women at Work. The publication of this report is sponsored by WDB Investment Holdings.

Download full report

About the report

Women on South African boards: facts, fiction and forward thinking is a publication of the Research Chair: Women at Work, at the University of Stellenbosch Business School, the publication of which was sponsored by WDB Investment Holdings (WDBIH) and published in March 2020 on the USB Management Review platform.

Prof Anita Bosch, USB Research Chair: Women at Work

Prof Kathleen van der Linde, Professor of Mercantile Law, University of Johannesburg

Shimon Barit, USB Research Fellow

Related articles

May 26

6 minutes to read

The gender pay gap: a guide fo...
Mar 02

8 minutes to read

Women on South African boards ...

Join the USB Management Review community

Subscribe to receive an email alert for new content on USB Management Review.

SUBSCRIBE NOW


Report The state of play in African coaching

State of Play in African Coaching

The Steinhoff Saga Management review - University of Stellenbosch Business School

July – December 2019

State of Play in African Coaching

Report The state of play in African coaching

  • Report by Nicky Terblanche, Jacques Myburgh and Jonathan Passmore
  • DEC 2019

6 minutes to read

SHARE

How is the coaching profession doing in Africa?

Globally, coaching is US$2 billion industry. Research on all aspects of coaching is therefore warranted. In 2016, the European Coaching and Mentoring Project was undertaken to explore coaching practices across Europe. In 2019, the same research was repeated in Africa to gain deeper insight into how coaches and coach providers practice coaching on the African continent, as well as to situate coaching in Africa within a wider context. This report provides an overview of the results, as well a comparison to the European results.

Coaching practice data was gathered via an online survey based on the original European Coaching and Mentoring Project, excluding the mentoring dimensions. In certain cases, the questions were tailored for the African context.

What did the study find?

The results indicate a significant similarity to the European study, although in a minority of instances there are telling differences. The relative similarity of coaching practice in Africa and Europe bodes well for an emerging discipline striving for professionalisation. However, it is also clear that Africa has unique needs and challenges, prompting coaching to deviate from European coaching norms where necessary.

The survey looked at, among others, the following:

  • How much time do coaches in Africa spend on conducting coaching?
  • How much do they charge?
  • How many years do the majority of coaches have?
  • What do the commissioners of coaching look for in a coach – a professional qualification or experience?
  • Which coaching models are preferred for career coaching? And for specific issues?
  • Do coaches prefer written or verbal coaching agreements?

This research was commissioned by the University of Stellenbosch Business School in association with Coaches and Mentors of South Africa (COMENSA) and the Henley Centre of Coaching.

Download full report

Related articles

May 26

6 minutes to read

The gender pay gap: a guide fo...
Mar 02

8 minutes to read

Women on South African boards ...

Join the USB Management Review community

Subscribe to receive an email alert for new content on USB Management Review.

SUBSCRIBE NOW