Alumni News 2020

What Library Services are available to the University of Stellenbosch Business School Alumni?

Alumnet

What Library Services are available to the University of Stellenbosch Business School Alumni?

  • Feb 28 2020

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Our library welcomes you

“The Stellenbosch University Bellville Park Campus Library offers special services and privileges to all alumni of Stellenbosch University. The University of Stellenbosch Business School alumni have different options to access information and resources needed to prepare for future studies.”

  • Henriette Swart, Director: Branch Libraries & Manager (USBL)

If you reside within 150km from the BPC or SU Campus, you have the following options available to you:

Access

All libraries of the Library and Information Service are accessible free of charge to alumni subject to positive identification with a valid identification document (photo identification is essential). ​​See Library hours.

Borrowing privileges

Available to alumni who reside within a 150 km radius of BPC or SU Campus:

  • Verification will be done on alumni database
  • Proof of address is required
  • Membership fee: R100 for 3 months; R400 per annum
  • Number of loans: 3 items
  • Borrowing period: 14 days per item
  • Renewals: 2 per item (within maximum renewal period of 42 days) unless someone else has requested it. Renew onlineor enquire at the lending desk.
  • Returns: To any of the libraries of the Library and Information Service
  • Fines for overdue items: R1.00 per item per day
  • Fine limit: R30 (borrowing privileges will be suspended when this limit has been exceeded)
  • Reserving books currently on loan: Free and unlimited. Reserve online or enquire at the lending desk.
  • Material available to borrow: All item types where POLICY is indicated as “Unrestricted”
  • Lost/damaged books: Replacement value payable to the Library and Information Service

If you reside outside of the 150km radius, from either BPC or SU Campus, then you still have access to a vast amount of free online resources.

Services

Electronic resources

Free self-help access is available to walk-in users only, in any of the libraries. Due to licensing agreements, access to some electronic resources is restricted to currently registered students and staff members of Stellenbosch University. There are, however, free e-resources available here.

Information services

Basic information services are provided to walk-in users. These include assistance to become self-sufficient in finding sources and information, in either printed or electronic format. Should assistance be required, please enquire at the lending desk of the Stellenbosch University Library or ask any staff member at the various branch libraries. For general enquiries concerning the Library’s collections and services, Ask a Librarian may be used.

Finding books, articles & other information resources

Walk-in users may visit the library homepage and type their search terms in the search box or choose E-databases or E-journals from the FIND menu. Guidelines are available at Find, access and use information effectively: a step by step guide. See Find information. Due to licensing agreements, access to some electronic resources are restricted to currently registered students and staff members of Stellenbosch University.

Internet & wireless access

No internet and wireless access is available to alumni in any of the libraries. Internet and wireless access is limited to Stellenbosch University staff and students registered on the University network.

Access to prospective Postgraduate Students

If you are planning to further your studies with a Master’s Degree or a PhD, please see the prospective postgraduate guide to view selected services. The first step to gain access, is to complete a recommendation form, signed by the supervisor of the prospective postgraduate student. The completed form must be handed in at the lending desk of the library. 

How to register as a prospective Postgraduate Student

In order to obtain off-campus access to the SU e-resources, prospective postgraduate students need to apply online to be enrolled as a network registered prospective postgraduate student at SU.

After network registration, you will have off-campus access to the USBL’s e-resources with your SU network username and password.

Follow the 3 steps below:

  1. Apply online to enrol as a prospective postgraduate student at Stellenbosch University. See Application fee.
    Note: This is not a complete registration as a postgraduate student at Stellenbosch University, but only an application for admission as a prospective postgraduate student at the University.
  2. Once your online application as a prospective postgraduate student is finalised by the University’s Admission Office, you will receive an e-mail providing you with your own SU username and temporary password.
    IMPORTANT: For any feedback on your online application process, please contact the SU Client Service Centre, tel: +27 21 8089111 or e-mail: info@sun.ac.za.
  3. After receiving a temporary password, please change and create an own unique password at Password Selfhelp. Once your password has been changed, you should have off-campus access to the Library’s e-resources using your new password.
  4. For security reasons you need to change your password via Password Selfhelp every 90 days otherwise your e-access will automatically expire.

IMPORTANT: Your SU network username will only be valid until the end of March each year where after you will have to follow the online application process again. If your proposal is accepted, you will automatically be registered for electronic services as soon as you register as an SU postgraduate student (see Undergraduate & postgraduate students).

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Tshego Gweneth Tlhapi: Changing for success

Alumnet

Tshego Gweneth Tlhapi: Changing for success

  • Feb 28 2020

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After working as a chemical engineer for 6 years, Tshego Tlhapi hung up her hard hat and switched her boots for heels as she changed careers. Now in the development finance industry, Tshego is an Investment Officer at the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) of South Africa, and tells us about her truly inspiring journey leading up to her big career change.

The transition to finance from engineering was catapulted by my MBA.  While doing my second year of the three year MBA program offered by USB, I found out about the IDC.  The mandate of the organisation appealed to me as it provided an opportunity for me to contribute towards economic development, particularly for individuals and companies that otherwise would not get funding.  Luckily for me the institution was looking for individuals with a strong engineering background, as a result in my role I sometimes get to visit engineering sites.  It’s a beautiful balance.

Born in Soweto to a nursing sister and a technician, I soon moved to then rural Bophutatswana to be raised by my late maternal grandmother Mmasione Mogotsi.

The time I spent with my grandmother was magical, she really instilled in me a sense of wonder, an appreciation for the arts and drive. When I was four years old, my grandmother was ready to take me to crèche. I had other plans; our house was right next to a primary school, so every day I would see kids clad in black and white or khakhi and black playing on the school grounds. I yearned to be one of them; so I requested to start primary school instead of crèche. After trying to convince me that I needed to start at crèche first, my grandmother arranged with the school to give me a trial run, hoping that I will see for myself that I indeed needed to start at crèche.

So at four years old, off I went to Gobusamang Primary School in khaki and black, absolutely excited, bright-eyed and face shining with Vaseline. Things were going well until one day I went home devastated that all the other kids could write their names on the exercise books, and I couldn’t.  Seeing the enthusiasm I had for learning, my grade 5 educated grandmother and former domestic worker, took twigs off the indigenous Moshabele tree; twig by twig she taught me how to write my name.  And so the precedent was set in my mind, if you want something go for it, the world around you will lift you toward it. With my grandmother’s tutelage, I was top in my class and so the competitive streak in me was nurtured.

Later on my uncle and I moved to Soweto to live with my parents and siblings, my strong and resilient mom Setshego Tlhapi took over the baton.  She has been my biggest cheerleader and motivator, having someone to remind me of what I am capable of has been critical in keeping me motivated.  Coming from a rural area and going to a multiracial school, I couldn’t speak English properly.  If I was not teased for not knowing English, I was teased about my rural background, amongst other things.  My confidence took a knock, I struggled through primary school, however, by the time I hit high school challenged myself and set a goal to always be in the top 10 of the grade. For the most part, I was.

A life changing moment for me in high school was when I was in grade 10, at that point all my subjects were on higher grade because I wanted to go to university, however; I was struggling with maths higher grade.  My maths teacher at the time Mr Khanyile set a test, if you pass the test you remained on higher grade; I failed. The mere thought of my university dreams being shattered had me begging to be allowed to do maths higher grade, I vowed never to fail another test. After him testing my resolve, he agreed, I kept my promise. Ultimately my dream came true when I got accepted to study chemical engineering at UCT.

At the time when I enrolled for the Modular MBA at USB in 2013, I was still in the engineering industry.  I remember the plant manager at the company I worked for commenting that an MBA would do nothing for me, particularly at my age and in the field I was in. The company didn’t fund MBAs at my level nor were they willing to offer study leave. That didn’t deter me – I knew I wanted to do an MBA so I took my savings and sold my property to pay my way through. It has been a fulfilling decision. I must say I am glad he and many others after him, didn’t deter me, the MBA has been beneficial in aiding me to have the career that I have.

 

The switching of industries was not easy; I had a lot of insecurities in my abilities to operate, as an engineer in an organisation that traditionally would hire Chartered Accounts.  The strong leadership component of the USB MBA is something that I refer to on a regular basis and various aspects of it come to my aid at different points in my life. Being able to pin point and label a challenge or weakness has allowed me to hone in on what exactly I need to strengthen. At the IDC my key responsibilities are business and project finance.

The organisation’s finance decisions pivot strongly off of the intense Due Diligence process that as investment officers, we conduct.  We are then responsible for developing financial models, structuring, preparing investment reports and presenting to various investment committees.  In project finance I participate in project development in various stages of the project development cycle (pre-feasibility, bankable and implementation). Soft skills such as negotiation, stakeholder management, conflict resolution, team leading and customer service also come into play. I have worked on transactions that have contributed approx. R4.6 billion to IDC’s investment book. Amongst these are the closing of investments in; the first black owned e-waste refinery, a multi-billion dollar natural gas project in Mozambique and the funding of the use of a new carbon capture, green technology.

One of the things the two matriarchs in my life (my mom and grandmother) instilled in me was an appreciation for my Setswana language and culture. Throughout out my university and working life I have participated in various social projects. This year I am starting a journey of developing social entrepreneurial endeavours that seek to promote the relevance of language and culture in early childhood development and identity.

I am heading back to the class room for an introduction to anthropology, in preparation for pursing an MA in Anthropology. I have also just completed writing a children’s Setswana book which I intend on self-publishing within the year. The book seeks to expose toddlers to reading in Setswana.  It also will have them and their parents engaged in the pertinent topic climate change.

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Alumnus of the Year 2019: Calling for nominations

Alumnet

Alumnus of the Year 2019: Calling for nominations

  • Feb 08 2020

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Who can be nominated?

Graduates of all USB’s programmes – including its MBA, PhD degrees, other Master’s programmes and Postgraduate Diplomas and graduates of USB-ED’s comprehensive executive development certificate programmes can be nominated.

Alumni who have excelled as responsible leaders in the private or public sector, or in an entrepreneurial venture, who support the values of USB and who act as ambassadors of USB.

Alumni who have achieved visibility during the past 12 to 18 months by, for instance, attracting the attention of the media for achievements in business, management or exceptional entrepreneurial activities, or leadership in business with strong environmental, social and ethical governance.

How do I nominate someone?

Submit you nomination for Alumnus of the Year 2019 to Christélle Cronjé, Alumni and Stakeholder Manager at christellecronje@usb.ac.za by Thursday, 31 March 2020.

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Namibia alumni

Meet the new Namibia Alumni committee

AlumNet

Meet the new Namibia Alumni committee

  • DEC 13 2017
  • Tags Technology, Business, News, University

Chairperson: Namibia Alumni chapter  

Deputy chairperson: Namibia Alumni chapter

Anna Hanghome

She currently works for NAMFISA as Manager: IT Security and Infrastructure. Anna has over 14 years’ experience in IT and is enrolled for the MBA at the University of Stellenbosch Business School. She has submitted her thesis for final evaluation and hope to be graduating in December 2017.  She also holds a B-Tech Degree in IT and a Diploma in Business Administration from Namibia University of Science and Technonolgy. Her interest areas include skills development and coaching and she also loves gardening and baking.

​​

Saara Laudika Hamunyela

She is a Chief Investment Promotion Officer in the Namibian Investment Centre where she is devoting her time to improve investor services, competitiveness and ease of doing business in Namibia since December 2015. She has experience in development economics, and takes special interest in service and change management as well as business process reengineering.   Hamunyela is currently an MPhil in Development Finance student at the USB.  She holds a Post Graduate Diploma in Development Finance, and a BTech Degree in Economics. She lives in Windhoek, Namibia.

Teopolina Namandje

She was born and raised in a small village in the northern part of Namibia. She is a Transport Economist working with the Roads Authority of Namibia. She is goal-driven and passionate about Rural Economic Development Initiatives, with a special focus on economically disadvantaged areas with no access to financial services. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics and is a graduate of the University of Stellenbosch Business School having completed an MPhil in Development Finance where she gained extensive knowledge in financing for development and project finance. Her hobbies include yoga, reading and travelling the world.

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usb alumni

Message from the President of the USB Alumni Association

AlumNet

Message from the President of the USB Alumni Association

  • Prof Prieur du Plessis
  • DEC 13 2017
  • Tags Technology, Business, News, University

Dear USB Alumnus

 

It is with excitement and pride that I reflect on USB, the commitment and contributions of alumni, and the outstanding achievements of USB alumni globally during 2017.

 

Contribution to USB accreditation

As a proud institution bearing the Triple Crown of international accreditations – namely AACSB, EQUIS and AMBA – USB was assessed by two of the accreditation bodies during 2017. Both AACSB and AMBA recently fully re-accredited USB for another five years. Congratulations to USB’s leadership, management, staff, students and alumni on this achievement.

 

Alumni ambassadors and achievers

During 2017, the USB Alumni Association’s executive, regional committees and members were regularly invited as guest speakers at alumni and industry engagement events, and at events aimed at continuous learning. They served as USB ambassadors at global events and regional information sessions, and contributed to grow the global network and footprint of the association. I thank alumni for sharing industry news and for sharing with others the value that their qualifications add to their work environment and career growth.

 

The USB Alumni Association and senior staff of USB appreciate the various ways in which alumni give back to USB through mentorship, guest lectures, testimonials, as ambassadors of USB, and in financial ways. We remain committed to support alumni in their career growth and continuous learning.

 

USB Alumnus of the Year 2017

At the USB-Kgalema Motlanthe Foundation Leadership Lecture Series hosted in partnership with USB on 27 October, the USB Alumni Association awarded the Alumnus of the Year Award 2017 to Mr Vuyani Jarana, newly appointed CEO of SAA and previously Chief Officer of Vodacom Business. Mr Jarana, an established and responsible corporate leader with sound decision-making skills, has served as the custodian of the values, culture and financial health of various business units and organisations. His success as a business leader is an example of the difference one person can make to sustainable business success in South Africa and beyond. I wish him every success and look forward to a lifelong partnership with him as ambassador of USB.

 

On behalf of the USB Alumni Association’s Exco, I thank our alumni for contributing to the proud legacy of the Business School and for their participation in the USB Alumni Association and its activities.

 

Wishing you and your family a blessed festive season and prosperous 2018.

 

Prof Prieur du Plessis

President of the USB Alumni Association

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bitcoin

Innovation without permission: Bitcoin

AlumNet

Innovation without permission: Bitcoin

  • Mehran Zarrebini
  • DEC 13 2017
  • Tags Technology, Business, News, University

​Bitcoin, blockchain, cryptocurrency have all become mainstream media topics recently with the meteoric rise in the value of Bitcoin, breaking through the 10 000 USD resistance level with needless to say … no resistance and approaching the 11 000 USD level only a few hours later. Naturally, a correction followed. Who knows what the value will be by the time you read this article.

 

Most of the world has now come to realise that it is inevitable that we are now going to see (over a period) broad adoption of a form of peer to peer digital money that is developed on a shared borderless, uncensored cryptographic ledger.  Whether or not this will be called Bitcoin or ultimately something else remains questionable. Broad adoption does not mean just Bitcoin. Bitcoin is essentially a test bed. Alternative cryptocurrencies might also become popular, some even more so than Bitcoin.

 

Adoption will unquestionably not come without various challenges. There is going to be resistance mainly from Financial Institutions due to the inherent threat that Bitcoin poses to them, and Governments who are determined to eradicate cash, the ultimate peer to peer currency in the form of a digital currency system that is driven by control, centralised authority and complete surveillance. We only have to look back at recent events in India, Venezuela and Zimbabwe to realise the scale of this problem.  The other problem facing adoption is its simplicity of use. Currently, very few people are capable of understanding how to perform transactions, store Bitcoin and secure Bitcoin on an individual basis without the need to involve a centralised authority or custodian.

 

With time, the technology will be simplified in a similar manner to how technology surrounding the use of email evolved. In 1989, this was an incredibly complicated and arduous process. Within a few years, it was not necessary to have computer programming knowledge to send an email. With Bitcoin, we are therefore at a similar stage in its evolution. Its broad adoption will be successful when you do not need to understand how the technology behind it functions.

 

We will see many new applications built on the bitcoin blockchain. We see many new variants of the original blockchain in the form of alternative cryptocurrencies. These new variants aim to improve the limitations of the existing bitcoin blockchain. There are now literally hundreds of alternative cryptocurrencies available. I believe that ultimately only a few will be adopted mainstream, the remainder will be insignificant.

 

Many of the applications built on the Bitcoin blockchain will be introduced by individuals who will have grown up in a decentralised environment, in a similar way to how successful applications like Facebook and Twitter were developed by individuals who never experienced life without the internet. This is inevitable.

 

Bitcoin is not a failed experiment. It is a practical manifestation of a major invention. It is un-censorable, durable, portable and fungible. It is the Internet of Money.

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mentor

Become a mentor to USB students

AlumNet

Become a mentor to USB students

mentor

  • DEC 03 2017
  • Tags Technology, Business, News, University

Alumni mentors provide an invaluable service by sharing their expertise and experience to help guide students in terms of their careers and studies.

We would therefore like to invite you to register as a mentor for students. The Alumni Mentorship Programme is a joint initiative organised by USB’s Alumni Office and Careers Office.

When USB students request mentoring services, they will be matched with an alumnus who can provide these services based on the mentor’s field of expertise, the location of both the student and the mentor, and other criteria. To help prepare alumni for this role, we host Mentorship Masterclasses. Our first Mentorship Masterclass was presented in March 2017. Another Mentorship Masterclass is planned for March 2018. This will be presented on campus as well as online (i.e. in blended learning format), allowing alumni from all over the world to link up via an internet-linked device.

What you need to do next

Please complete the registration form for alumni mentors. You can do this by clicking here​. We then compile a database of alumni who are willing to give back to USB by mentoring students. You will also be invited to attend the Mentorship Masterclass. This provides us with the capacity to support students with mentoring services and to match mentors with students.

Further information

For more details, please contact Christélle Cronjé, Manager: Alumni and Stakeholders at ccronje@sun.ac.za or Janine Truter, Manager: Careers janinet@sun.ac.za.

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